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An alleged dispute between man and wife evolved into serious charges earlier this week. A 36-year-old Manteca man reportedly hopped into the family minivan after he had an argument with his wife. She then jumped onto the hood of the van in an effort to stop him from leaving. Witnesses claim the man drove at excessive speeds for 35 miles Saturday, just after 12:30 a.m., with his wife on the hood of the vehicle.

Police reportedly arrested the man later Saturday morning at his home on charges of attempted murder, kidnapping and domestic violence.

Law enforcement claims at least two people called 911 to report a minivan racing down a Northern California freeway in the middle of the night. The witnesses say the van was travelling at speeds up to 100 miles per hour during the 35 mile drive from Manteca to Pleasanton. All during the event, the 25-year-old woman reportedly was sprawled across the hood of the minivan as it raced down the freeway, hanging on to the windshield wiper blades.

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The United States Supreme Court ruled on Monday that statements made during an ongoing emergency may be introduced as evidence in a criminal trial even if the person that made the statements has died before the trial. Santa Cruz criminal defense attorneys know that the Sixth Amendment guarantees a criminal defendant the right to confront the witnesses against the defendant at trial. The right to confrontation includes the right to cross examine the witness.

Monday's Supreme Court ruling says the statements introduced at trial of an alleged murder victim through the testimony of police officers did not violate the defendant's right to confrontation. Justice Antonin Scalia wrote a scathing dissent. Justice Scalia says Monday's ruling distorts the high court's "Confrontation Clause jurisprudence and leaves it in a shambles." Justice Scalia goes on to say majority opinion demeans the Supreme Court.

The case arose out of an incident that happened in Detroit in 2001. Police responded to a report of a shooting. Several police officers responded and found a man who had been shot lying near his car in a gas station parking lot. Each officer asked the man several questions. The man reportedly told police the identity of the man who allegedly shot him. The man died later that morning at the hospital.

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Actress Lindsay Lohan appeared before Judge Keith Schwartz in Del Aire Court this morning to face a felony charge of grand theft. Prosecutors allege Lohan stole a $2,500 necklace from a Venice jewelry store. Lohan entered a not guilty plea to the California theft charge in February.

At the Wednesday morning court appearance Judge Schwartz told Lohan that if she accepts a plea agreement from prosecutors she will face jail time. "If you plead in front of me, if this case resolves in front of me, you are going to jail. Period. It may be an issue as to amount of time," Judge Schwartz told Lohan.

Law enforcement claims they have video of Lohan wearing a necklace at the Venice, California jewelry store, obtained from store surveillance cameras. The Los Angeles Times reports that police also obtained paparazzi photos taken days after the alleged incident showing Lohan wearing the necklace in public. Law enforcement claims they have statements from witnesses who allegedly were present in the store.

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FBI agents and police officers testified at a congressional hearing Thursday regarding increasing difficulties that law enforcement is experiencing in attempting to gather evidence against people they suspect of committing offenses. Law enforcement claims that new forms of communication inhibit their ability to conduct wiretaps.

California criminal defense attorneys know that evidence cannot be used to convict an individual if law enforcement gathers evidence in an unconstitutional manner. The Fourth Amendment protects against unreasonable searches and seizures. Members of law enforcement, however, told congressional leaders yesterday that many new forms of communication provide law enforcement with increased difficulty in placing wiretaps even where the wiretap is authorized under a warrant.

Speaking before a House Judiciary subcommittee, FBI general counsel Valerie Caproni said it is "exponentially more difficult" to place a court-authorized wiretap on some forms of new technology. She says people can communicate via anonymous avatars and through wireless technology that evades wiretaps.

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Prosecutors alleged the man placed a pair of gloves and some wire in his waistband at a Home Depot store in Lake Elsinore in 2009. A witness testified that the man pulled his sweatshirt over his waist line and then left the store with the items still in his waistband.

The defendant exercised his right to testify in his own defense at trial. The 44-year-old told the jury he intended to steal the items, but changed his mind before leaving the store. The defendant told the jury that he turned around inside the store.

The jury deliberated for only fifteen minutes before rendering its guilty verdict to felony level petty theft. The jury was not aware that prosecutors are seeking the 25 years to life sentence under the three strikes law. Jurors are not allowed to consider the potential sentencing that could be imposed in they render a guilty verdict.

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