Blog
CALL US FOR A FREE CONSULTATION
Call Us831-426-5800 Call Us831-566-4357
303 Potrero Street, Suite 30, Santa Cruz, CA 95060
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in drug charges

The original investigation centered on a 2004 shooting outside a Pico Rivera liquor store. A homicide officer reportedly was reviewing photographs of tattoos of suspected gang members when he saw a familiar depiction on the chest of the 25-year-old. The investigator says the tattoo depicted a scene similar to that involved in the 2004 liquor store shooting.

Police arrested the man on a minor charge in 2008. While the tattooed man was being held in jail on the minor charge, police say they used a jailhouse decoy to get a confession to murder from the young man.

While he was being held on the murder charge, law enforcement claims the man called his mother on two separate two occasions. The calls in the jail are monitored. Prosecutors say the phone calls include evidence of a drug conspiracy. Prosecutors claim that the man conspired with his mother and three other people to smuggle narcotics into the jail system.

...

The incident began around 8:00 in the morning when calls were placed to the police station regarding a stray pit bull trying to attack a leashed dog whose owner was taking the pet for a walk. The dog turned out to be an Argentine Dogo. The dog reportedly lunged at one of the police officers. Law enforcement claims the dog bumped the officer in the chest and tried to bite the officer's face. The officer responded with force, shooting the dog in its head.

The injured dog fled to the backyard of a nearby residence. Police approached the residence to talk to the occupants about the injured animal. Law enforcement claims that during the investigation related to the dog, police uncovered evidence of marijuana at the house.

Two people reportedly were in the house during the contact with police. One of the occupants reportedly admitted responsibility for drugs that were found in the house. Police seized an undisclosed amount of processed marijuana and marijuana plants. The man who police say claimed responsibility for the drugs was arrested on several drug charges.

...
Tagged in: drug charges marijuana

Police in Los Angeles closed down a portion of a freeway after law enforcement executed a search warrant at a warehouse over the weekend. Police raided a warehouse in downtown Los Angeles on Saturday night. The warrant reportedly was related to suspicions regarding a single suspect.

When police arrived at the warehouse to serve the warrant, they say they found over 3,000 marijuana plants in the building. Law enforcement says that as many as 20 people were detained during execution of the search warrant. Police say that no arrests have been made. However, police say that potential California drug charges are pending.

Police continue to process the information and evidence seized during the search. Police claim that they gathered evidence including traces of chemicals used in the manufacture of methamphetamine. The freeway was closed while police and hazardous materials teams investigated the area.

...

In the cases that have already been dropped, individuals were charged with a variety of California crimes. The dropped charges range from grand theft to felony California drug charges.

Four videos have been released that appear to contradict details that officers wrote in police reports in a number of criminal cases. Officers reportedly also testified in court inconsistently with what appears in the videos. Two of the videos show plainclothes officers making illegal entries into rooms at a San Francisco residential hotel. A third video depicts plainclothes officers kicking in a hotel door. The hotel room reportedly was occupied by a disabled man.

A fourth video, released Monday, apparently obtained from security video recorded at the Henry Hotel shows a man wearing a black coat entering the hotel. Police reported they had seen the man enter the hotel wearing a white and tan jacket. Police seized a white and tan jacket in the hotel room. Police had claimed they discovered crack cocaine and marijuana in the light colored jacket. Later, police arrested the man.

...

The California Supreme Court recently issued a ruling that allows law enforcement to search the texts and other data stored on a cell phone without a warrant after an arrest. Cell phones are becoming more and more sophisticated as technology advances. The data stored on a cell phone may be free game to law enforcement after an arrest under the ruling.

The case stems from a 2007 Ventura County arrest. Police arrested the defendant in the case on suspicion of committing a California drug crime. After arresting the man, police found a cell phone that the defendant was carrying. Roughly 90 minutes after the arrest, an officer searched through text messages stored on the cell phone and found a text message that allegedly incriminated the defendant.

The message reportedly read "6 4 80." Police alleged the message related to the sale of six ecstasy pills for $80. The man later confessed to the drug deal. The defendant challenged the admissibility of the evidence in court on the basis that the warrantless search was illegal.

...

News surfaced nine months ago that a technician at the San Francisco Police Department Crime Laboratory was skimming evidence from the narcotics unit for her own personal use. The technician reportedly stole cocaine evidence. The San Francisco Police Department closed the narcotics unit in May.

A U.S. Senator announced last month that he intends to introduce federal legislation to reform the field of forensic science nationwide. On the heels of the scandal in San Francisco, many experts are questioning the integrity of evidence used in California drug possession cases.

The rogue technician crime lab scandal only extended as far as the San Francisco narcotics unit within the lab. Sources have reported that other discrepancies have occurred in the lab. A mix-up of test tubes containing DNA evidence has been reported. Officials reportedly concealed the DNA mix-up for two years.

...
Back to Top