Tough laws, stringent enforcement and education initiatives - colleges around the country have experimented with many strategies to reduce the risk of underage drinking on their campuses, and have failed. Many colleges have now begun experimenting with less conventional methods, in an effort to reduce binge drinking on campus.

Binge drinking is the consumption of five or more alcoholic beverages in a single session, and it is one of the most dangerous behaviors that a college student can engage in. Binge drinking is strongly linked to DUI.

In a new study, researchers at the University at Buffalo, State University Of New York found that talking about the risk between drinking alcohol and dying in a fatal accident is not an effective way to reach out to college students. However, students pay more attention to the dangers of drunk driving when they are told about the possible association between drinking alcohol and cancer. The researchers found later that those students who believed that there was a strong association between alcohol and cancer were actually much less likely to binge drink.

The Yale College Dean's Office actually offers free bartender training and certification classes for undergraduates. During the program, students are taught to mix drinks. The theory is that when students are taught to mix alcoholic beverages, they are much more likely to drink responsibly.

At Harvard University, students are actually given money for parties and encouraged to spend it on things other than alcohol. At the University Of Virginia, designated drivers are rewarded with free non-alcohol beverage, pizzas, and other gifts. At one campus, officials allow students of the legal drinking age to undergo special training in conducting on-campus parties with alcohol. The theory is that when students have access to a party involving alcohol on campus, they don’t feel the need to go to a bar, and drive drunk.