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Two mixed martial arts competitors associated with the Ultimate Fighting Championship are facing California criminal charges. Officials have charged Jason "Mayhem" Miller with misdemeanor vandalism upon allegations that he caused damage to a Mission Viejo, California church during an incident last month. Meanwhile UFC featherweight contender Chad Mendes is accused of battery after an alleged incident at a bar in Hanford, California in late July.

Miller was originally arrested August 13, after police claim the MMA fighter was found naked in a Mission Viejo church. Police claim that the UFC competitor had damaged at least $400 worth of property inside the church, including a picture frame and a propane tank.

Authorities say that the MMA fighter had been spray painting inside the church. Orange County prosecutors announced that Miller was officially charged Wednesday with vandalism. He is scheduled to appear in court in Newport Beach, California November 21 on the misdemeanor charge.

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California officials say that an 82-year-old woman will be facing seven counts of burglary and one count of attempted burglary after a police detective says that he recognized the woman's hair in a security video. Law enforcement says that the woman has a so-called M.O. that has led to many arrests for California theft crimes. The woman reportedly told authorities after her arrest last week that this is a case of mistaken identity.

Like the current allegations, in 2009 a Torrance Police detective had claimed to have recognized the woman in a security video, based upon a bulletin issued several years earlier from Beverly Hills. After that incident, the woman was given a three year prison term, and was released on parole after serving nine months.

The newest charges are being brought in Los Angeles County. Authorities say that the woman targeted doctor's offices. Police began receiving reports from doctor's offices claiming that cash was missing from the office. That is when detectives looked to find security videos, and one detective says that he recognized the woman's hair on the footage. Authorities say that the alleged thefts fit the woman's M.O.

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Prosecutors are seeking second-degree murder charges against a 28-year-old Santa Rosa, California woman after she was allegedly involved in a fatal car accident in Sonoma County Saturday afternoon. Deputies claim that the woman was involved in some form of domestic dispute with her ex-boyfriend before the fatal crash. Authorities say that the ex-boyfriend had left on his motorcycle during an argument and the woman hopped in her Acura to chase after him.

Witnesses claim the Acura and motorcycle were speeding at 50 to 80 miles per hour on Hall Road, west of Santa Rosa. Authorities claim that the woman lost control of her Acura and struck a Lexus while chasing her ex-boyfriend. The Lexus then slammed into a Triumph sports car. The Triumph flipped over, trapping the driver inside. The sports car erupted into flames, killing the driver.

Originally, Sonoma County deputies arrested the woman on vehicular manslaughter and reckless driving charges. But prosecutors upped the ante this week, and filed second-degree murder charges against the woman, based upon the theory of implied malice. This blog has previously discussed implied malice in the context of so-called "Watson-murder" cases after an alleged fatal DUI car accident.

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Santa Cruz criminal defense lawyers know that privacy issues in the technological age are complex. The cellphone carriers say that many police requests for cellphone information arrive without any warrant. Prosecutors may file a subpoena for the records, but such subpoenas are not passed before the scrutiny of a judge, as is needed to obtain a warrant.

One U.S. Senator from the Midwest has asked the Justice Department how many times the agency has made a request for location information from a cellphone carrier. He also has asked the Justice Department what legal standard applies to making such a request.

Of great concern to many, including lawmakers, is the use of cellphones in location tracking. Apparently the Justice Department responded that it does not keep tabs on the number of requests, but the agency claims that generally in criminal matters it seeks a court order for cellphone requests.

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A Southern California Assemblyman apparently wants to add more registration requirements for people who are released from California prisons, or people whose sentence has been deemed to have been served when entering post-release community supervision after a California felony conviction. The Assemblyman was joined by a Southern California police chief during a pitch of the idea to the public safety committee of the California Senate.

Current California law requires people entering post-release community supervision to enter an agreement with county officials. The agreement includes a number of requirements, including registration in the person's county of residence. Proponents of the new measure want to add another potential layer of registration, if a local agency decides to pass a local ordinance.

The Assembly bill seeks to give municipalities, or city and county relationships, to pass local ordinances requiring people placed on community supervision to register with local law enforcement agencies when taking up residence in the city, or city and county. Obviously, critics of the Assembly proposal say that the measure would add yet another requirement that could easily trip up a probationer, leading to exposure to more time behind bars.

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